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20130710
20130710
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, cbo shows us $642 billion deficit, down to 4% gdp for this year, that is weighed down from 10.1% four years ago and if you will, that takes a little bit of the impetus for coming up with an embargo on tax reform, reduces that even if all the projections indicate that those large deficits come ring back. so i see this tax reform issue as being tougher. the other thing i will comment on and take your questions is the affordable care act. this is a very big deal for the services i indicated, a very challenging endeavor we saw last week with the administration delayed for a year mandate that employers provide certain categories of insurance or face penalties. clearly a recognition of the lack of readiness out there in the work force. you have seen a lot of interesting things happen there. i can tell you from indianapolis, i was eating the same day that announcement came out before i heard about it at a national chain and i don't cook. so i eat out. there are several restaurants that know me well and the manager was -- good restaurant, part of a pretty big chain, telling me it came down fr
million jobs and actually reduce the deficit by $24 billion. what a remarkable trifecta of accomplishments, supporting one of the world's most cutting edge agricultural economies, supporting significant employment and job creation and significantly cutting our deficit. what's not to love, madam president, in that farm bill? well, the house passed a series of amendments that eliminated our hard-fought bipartisan compromises and has effectively doomed the bill. similarly, the senate here passed a bipartisan water resources development act to modernize america's water infrastructure all over the country, including drinking water, waste water treatment, shipping channels. it got 83 votes here out of 100 in the senate. it's being slow walked in the house over ideological objections about the power of the government on environmental authority. after a historic committee markup, after the congressional budget office said it would reduce the deficit by $150 billion in the first decade and $700 billion in the second, this senate passed an overwhelmingly bipartisan immigration reform bill. i think o
meltdown. and federal dollars are very scares. as we face this huge deficit together, we have to look at every option available to meet the challenges of doing more with less. i urge my colleagues to support my amendment. and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey rise? mr. frelinghuysen: i move to strike the last word. i rise to oppose the amendment of the the gentleman from georgia. his amendment would cut $15 million. i should say for the record, we cut $220 million from last year's number and so we have substantially reduced this account. let me just say, too, the basic science program within the department conducts research with a staggering potential for benefits for our nation. cutting the program further, which is what he seeks, threatens our long-term energy security, first american scientists and industry and blemishes our credibility as a world-wide leader in basic science programs. i oppose his amendment and urge others to do likewise. i yield back. ms. kaptur: i move to strike the las
the deficit and ultimately address the towering debt that we're facing as a country, not only today but even the worse debt we'll be facing given the current trend we're on in the future. mr. chairman, remember when we were told to get our tires properly inflated and people snickered saying, is this an energy policy? well, at least those ideas actually saved energy and actually saved cost. albeit a drop in the bucket. but now in one of its latest efforts, along comes the department of energy and proposes a regulation to impose destructive and unnecessary energy efficiency standards for ceiling fans. and like much of their agenda, it is completely counterproductive. it's big government run amuck, another example. it's an example of the complete disregard bureaucrats have for the practical implications of the regulations that they issue. the department of energy contends that a certain amount of energy would be saved by requiring greater efficiency from ceiling fans, as the gentlelady mentioned and explained. now, of course, that ignores the fact that ceiling fans are already far more energy e
of boosting the economy and reducing the deficit, terms that republican lawmakers may be able to digest. in specifics, it reads that reform will grow the economy by 3.3% and bring down the deficit by close to $8850 billion over the next -- by close to $850 billion over the next 20 years. we're back after the break. actually mean it. >> you're putting out there something that you're proud of. journalists want the the story and they want the right story and the want the true story. >> you can say anything here. >> i spent a couple of hours with a hooker. >> your mistake was writing a check. >> she never cashed it! >> the war room. >> compared to other countries with tighter gun safety laws our death toll is just staggering. >> the young turks. >> the top bankers who funneled all the money to the drug lords, no sentence. there's just no justice in that. >> viewpoint. >> carl rove said today that mitt romney is a lock to win next pope. he's garunteeing it. >> joy behar: say anything. >> is the bottom line then that no white person should ever, ever, ever use the "n" word? >> yes! >> only on
in the future and paying off our deficit. we simply cannot afford to spend taxpayer dollars on research, the private sector can do better and taxpayers should not be asked to provide additional support to an industry that consistently has record-breaking profits. our energy sector has some of the of the most promising ideas and technologies in the world. our energy policy, however, is horribly outdated. h.r. 2609 slashes research and development for renewable energy by some 60% and adds additional money that the administration either want -- neither wants nor needs to research fossil fuels and clean coal. at the same time it continues to spend far too much on fossil fuel r&d. in fact, we dole out more fossil fuel subsidies than any other country. more than $500 billion in 2011. and they often go to expensive projects with little upside. the fact is we don't need to spend taxpayer money this way. fossil fuel companies are highly profitable, posting some of the highest profits in the world, and they can shoulder than other r&d costs. -- their own r&d costs. this is a clear example of dupl
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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